Introduction to multi-day running

Introduction to multi-day running

For years people have been holidaying in New York, Athens, Paris and London, seeing the world while running some of the biggest marathons organised. Lately, this adventure tourism has taken a step away from the comforts of society. For some, running a marathon on a marked out course is simply not enough.

Over the last 10 years or so, events all over the world, including places as inhospitable as the deserts of Morocco and the tundra of Alaska have been quietly attracting a few hundred runners each year.

Competitors in these events will quite often have to run, or walk, much further than 26 miles in some of the harshest conditions known. Most of these events also require you to be completely self sufficient - competitors complete a course carrying a rucksack containing all their food and equipment for the duration of the event.

The extent of back-up and support they receive depends on the length and duration of the event and the conditions in which it is held. Navigational skills are frequently required and obviously a very high level of endurance fitness is essential, as well as a 'certain' mindset.

Every event is different and unique. In the UK there are several ultra-marathons an

The Marathon des Sables, regarded by many as 'The most arduous race in the world', is a typical stage race
d mountain marathons. Some of these run a course in the most unspoilt of landscapes - this is something that certainly helped me on my way to complete my first 40 miler!

However, some people don't stop there. In the UK we have the internationally recognised Original Mountain Marathon (OMM) held over a whole weekend - and there are various other race formats. 

The Marathon des Sables, regarded by many as 'The most arduous race in the world', is a typical stage race. Stages range from 20 to 90 kilometres and take you through the most inhospitable of terrain and temperatures of the Sahara desert.

The Jordan Desert Cup however, is a non-stop event. You have over 110 miles of scorching deserts and freezing mountains before finishing at Petra, one of the ancient wonders of the world.

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