Scrambling

Scrambling

This hefty section written by scramblers will help you start out, manage a group, deal with route finding and safety concerns, figure out what clothing and equipment you need, and work through a range of technical issues from knots to descending, leading to training. Phew!

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Starting out in scrambling

Starting out in scrambling

by Scott Muir

This article explores the main issues when starting out. Amongst other topics it covers route selection, training, information sources and weather, together with some top tips to increase your security and safety whilst scrambling.

Preparation

Preparation

by Scott Muir

Good planning and preparation for a scramble greatly reduces the chances of difficulties and problems arising.

Checklist

Checklist

by Scott Muir

You don't want to be weighed down by carrying more gear than you need on a scrambling route, and you can't afford to compromise your safety by not having enough, or the right items of gear. Use the checklist to make sure that you are covered for both 'standard' scrambles and harder, more exposed routes.

Group management for scrambling

Group management for scrambling

by Nigel Williams

Leading groups scrambling is not something to be undertaken lightly. This article looks at the key factors to bear in mind when leading a group on the more adventurous end of the walking continuum.

Emergency procedures

Emergency procedures

by Scott Muir

If you visit the hills regularly it is inevitable that eventually you will encounter an emergency situation, hopefully not your own.

Route finding

Route finding

by Scott Muir

This article highlights the main features to look for in good guidebooks and offers some advice on using and interpreting them effectively. The article also explores the need for accurate route finding, which is greatly assisted by good guidebook descriptions and offers some practical advice to help you stay on route when scrambling.

Safety concerns

Safety concerns

by Scott Muir

This article explores the main safety concerns to consider before attempting a rock scramble. Important issues like down climbing, retreating and weather issues are covered in depth with some top tips that will allow you to explore and tackle Britain's scrambles with greater safety.

Kit- footwear

Kit- footwear

by Scott Muir

Most people can scramble with a good stiff soled pair of walking boots, especially if they have a reasonable edge to them. On lower graded scrambles you won't notice much difference whatever you're wearing, but you could you find yourself soloing on serious ground and realise that it is well worth buying the right kit for the job.

Kit- helmets and harnesses

Kit- helmets and harnesses

by Andy Kirkpatrick

If you take your safety seriously then wearing a helmet should be a top priority. In sports like horse riding and mountain biking wearing a helmet is now the norm, and it won't be long until the majority of climbers and scramblers follow suit. Similarly, if you're using a rope, then a harness will greatly improve your security.

Kit- protection

Kit- protection

by Andy Kirkpatrick

As a scrambler you use your skill and judgement to safeguard your passage over exposed terrain. Occasionally you might choose to use a rope either to safeguard yourself or give security to your partner. In these situations it's worth carrying a small selection of climbing gear to increase safety. This article gives guidance on what to take.

Kit- ropes and slings

Kit- ropes and slings

by Andy Kirkpatrick

This article covers the rope and protection equipment suitable for moderate to difficult scrambling, including choosing the correct rope diameter and length.

Technical issues- anchors and attaching

Technical issues- anchors and attaching

by Libby Peter

Once you have decided to use a rope you will also need a system that is safe and efficient. This involves: Selecting appropriate anchors Attaching yourself to the anchors Belaying the rope effectively.

Technical issues- descending

Technical issues- descending

by Libby Peter

Difficult scrambles can become very serious, or even impossible under certain weather conditions, so it is essential that you are confident to retreat in safety. This involves: Selecting an appropriate anchor Setting up an abseil Abseiling smoothly with an Italian hitch Retrieving the rope

Technical issues- direct belays

Technical issues- direct belays

by Libby Peter

Direct belays are simple and quick to set up, but do require some thought on selecting a suitable anchor. This article looks at: Testing the anchors Types of direct belay Operating an Italian hitch

Technical issues- health

Technical issues- health

by Chris Fenn

Scrambling routes are fun, they present a challenge, but they also carry some risk. The most common injuries are bruising and injuries to the ankle. Find out how to treat these injuries on the hill and what to eat to speed repair and recovery.

Technical issues- knots and tying in

Technical issues- knots and tying in

by Libby Peter

A few basic knots will cover all your scrambling needs.

Technical issues- leading and seconding

Technical issues- leading and seconding

by Libby Peter

Once you are using a rope on scrambles it is essential to have a system that is simple, logical and properly understood by all members of the party. This includes; good communication, familiarity of climbing sequence, climbing calls, and experience of how to belay from below and above.

Technical issues- moving together

Technical issues- moving together

by Libby Peter

Moving together is an advanced scrambling technique that is occasionally useful on British scrambles. It involves: Shortening the rope by taking body coils, both moving at the same time, and placing runners or passing the rope around spikes of rock.

Technical issues- training

Technical issues- training

by Scott Muir

Indoor walls have sprung up all over the UK. They present an ideal opportunity for scramblers to improve their physical movement skills in warm, dry and safe conditions. They are not just the home of the high performance rock jock, but are now being used by many sportsmen and women as an excellent form of cross training.

Tips on choosing scrambling courses

Tips on choosing scrambling courses

by Nigel Shepherd

If you want to venture to more remote locations, tackle higher ground or walk all year round, then your navigation, foot work, rope work and survival skills might be tested to the limit. Find out what to do to any problems and deal with situations from qualified people on an outdoor course.

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