Climbing equipment- accessories

Climbing equipment- accessories

Once you start buying climbing gear you realise that you have never got enough... Here's what's essential, what's not, and some gadgets, gizmos and weirdness.

Once you start buying climbing gear you realise that you have never got enough. To begin with, you buy the basic gear you need to get you off the ground, and then the non-essential but really useful stuff that you can get by without but would prefer not too. Then you spot gadgets, gizmos and weirdness that other climbers have and you haven't. Well here's a brief run down of just a few of the items you may not be able to live without.


Then you spot gadgets, gizmos and weirdness that other climbers have and you haven't

Sport 

Finger tape is crucial if you're going to ignore your physio's advice and crank on that poor injured finger, plus it has hundreds of other uses, most of them nothing to do with climbing. The cheapest way to buy it is to go for the broader tape (25mm) rather than the narrower tape, and tear the tape off in half strips.

A clip-stick is also invaluable if you're not keen on bouldering out the first few moves of your route in order to clip the first bolt. Check out the new telescoping rods at your local fishing shop, they're awesome! Use some of that finger tape to hold the quickdraw in place (told you you'd use it for more than your fingers). Don't forget to clip your rope into the draw!

Trad

A simple but invaluable accessory is ID tape, which comes in various colours and is used to mark up all your hardware and slings. Unless you've got a very limited number of partners mark your gear with two colours rather than one.

Find you don't have enough room on your harness for all your protection? Then take a look at a bandolier; a simple, adjustable, padded sling (the best are full strength and can be used as protection) that goes over your shoulder and increases your racking capacity by 50 percent.

Check out the new telescoping rods at your local fishing shop, they're awesome! Use some of that finger tape to hold the quickdraw in place...

Bouldering

If your chalk bag empties faster than a sport climber's stomach, check out the big bouldering buckets. These giant chalk bags will take several blocks of chalk. Extended brush. Already got a brush? How about taking along your cheater stick and taping your brush to it so you can clean up that out of reach sloper?

Indoor

Chalk balls are a good idea if climbing indoors, keeping spillage and excess chalk in the air down to a minimum. A rope tarp is also a great idea, to keep the dirt on the floor, not on your rope.

Deep water soloing

You'll need a towel to keep your golden locks looking fine after a dip. You might like a 'quick dry' chalk bag, one without pile and made from vinyl. And your 100m badge to add to your Lycra shorts!

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